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Erasing your digital past November 18, 2008

Posted by farshadf in Uncategorized.
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ComputerWorld recently did a piece about erasing your digital past and how difficult it can be to remove embarrassing and damaging search results from sites like Google. They gave themselves a week to try to expunge unwanted online mentions, using three real-life examples as test cases: First, a recent college graduate with a distinctive last name would like to get rid of an entry on someone else’s long-abandoned online journal. Next, a freelance writer is mistakenly identified as a movie critic on Rotten Tomatoes, and doesn’t want her byline juxtaposed next to the word “rotten.” Last, an IT professional who gave a quote to Computerworld in an interview seven years ago that included a salty phrase. So who’s reputation is now clean?

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Share Files Over the Internet from Your Computer with HFS January 11, 2008

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Windows only: Freeware application HFS (HTTP File Server) makes it dead simple to run a server to share files from your computer over the web. All you have to do is run the application on the computer with files you want to share, then selectively pick files or directories you want to allow access to. In addition, you can even upload files to your HFS server from elsewhere. You’ll need to set upport forwarding for port 80 on the computer running HFS and then either remember your public IP address (which may change) or assign a name to your home server (for free) so it’s easy to remember. HFS is freeware, Windows only, and weighs in at a svelte 550KB. HFS Advanced mode even supports user accounts.

Steal Music From Any Shared iTunes Library January 11, 2008

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Windows/Mac only: Freeware application ourTunes downloads music from any shared iTunes library on your network to any folder on your computer. There’s a good chance you’ve heard of ourTunes (or a similar app, myTunes) before, as it used to be the go-to app for sharing music with your peers using your iTunes library, but every time Apple updated iTunes, ourTunes would die another death. Well, it’s back, and it works with iTunes 7. I hadn’t used ourTunes in a while, and things seemed to be working differently, so to get you up and running, here’s how it works.

First you’ll want to download the ourTunes.jar file from the Save OurTunes web site. If it’s not already installed, you’ll also need to download and install Java on your computer.

Now fire up iTunes and ourTunes on your computer. Before you go any further, I’d recommend choosing a download folder for all that music you’re about to download. Done? Then let’s move ahead.

If there are other computers on your network, you’ll see them start popping up in the ourTunes (and iTunes, for that matter) sidebar. In ourTunes, click on the name of the library you want to download music from. ourTunes will work a little magic, creating a duplicate entry for this shared library in your iTunes sidebar. Click on the duplicate library in iTunes, let it load the library, and then you’re ready to go.

So how do you download songs? Easy—just play the song in iTunes and ourTunes will start sucking down the file to the folder you chose above. It downloads quickly, so you don’t have to listen to the entire song before moving to the next. Generally songs just take a few seconds to land on your desktop.

Microsoft Will Buy 20 Companies a Year for 5 Years October 18, 2007

Posted by farshadf in Interesting, Uncategorized.
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Steve Ballmer showed up at Thursday morning’s session of the Web 2.0 Summit ready to talk about acquisitions. Starbucks cup in hand, the Microsoft chief executive, told conference host John Battelle that Microsoft is ready to buy twenty companies a year consistently for the next 5 years.

“Those will be good acquisitions, and they’re important to us,” he said. “And they’re of strategic importance. When you say ‘What are you going to buy that’s $15 billion,’ there are not many things at that price range. At that price range, you’re talking about a couple dozen things, and on those I can basically say ‘No comment.’

Ballmer half-jokingly said the purchases will range between 50 or 100 million to a couple hundred million each. He also offered up his e-mail address (steveb@microsoft.com), inviting entrepreneurs to pitch him any products they may want to sell.

“My god, you’re about to get a thousand e-mails,” Battelle said.

“Maybe one will be worth buying,” Ballmer responded.

More highlights from the talk below.

Continue reading “Ballmer: Microsoft Will Buy 20 Companies a Year for 5 Years” »

 http://blog.wired.com/monkeybites/

Extend the life of your flat-screen TV October 11, 2007

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Average life span: Ten years or longer.

Preventive medicine: Keep your fingers off the screen. “The pressure causes pixel burnout,” says Robbie Baldwin, a flat screen–TV salesman at Best Buy in Baltimore. Because parts can fail (read: melt) if a TV overheats, keep the vents clear so they can “pull in air to cool the unit,” says Dan Wiersma, senior vice president of service for Sony Electronics. Dust with a soft, dry cloth, and skip the cleaning spray, which can cloud the screen.

Most common ailment: The screen has a burned-in image that never seems to go away, and the picture is a little fuzzy.

Diagnosis and treatment: Plasma screens, especially older ones, are sensitive to “burn in” problems. Leave Comedy Central on all day and its logo may never disappear. (Newer models don’t have as many burn-in issues, but it’s best to turn off the TV every few hours.) A repair service can recalibrate a slightly hazy picture for as little as $250 or as much as $750, depending on the damage and the shop.

When to pull the plug: A malfunctioning flat-screen TV that’s more than five years old should probably be replaced. Labor and parts run high, so a new model may cost you less than fixing an old one.

Cellphone Signal Extender: Better Than Outside July 11, 2007

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zboost.jpg
ThinkGeek.com is now selling a zBoost cell phone signal booster, designed to boost a 1 bar cell signal up to 5 bars over an area of 1500 square feet (equating to about 2 or 3 rooms over a few floors, depending on where the unit is mounted). Installation involves plugging the antenna into the base unit… And that’s it, the thing just boosts away. It’ll work on CDMA, GSM, TDMA AMPS, GPRS, EDGE, 1xRTT, and EVDO. In other words, all networks except Nextel.

The iPhone Costs Apple $220 in Components July 3, 2007

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dollar-iphone.jpgHey, a guy’s gotta make a buck, and it looks like Apple is a guy that’s gotta make a lot of bucks. When technology analyst fir Portelligent dissected the iPhone, they determined the components of the 4GB model run $200, with the 8GB running just $20 more. But Portelligent admits that it’s tough to price components with intentionally mysterious origins.

The touchscreen, for example, is estimated to be the most expensive component of the phone at $60. But there are no markings under the surface as to where the screen was manufactured, even though most people believe it was a German company named Balda. The microprocessor is clearly of Samsung origin, even though stamped firmly with the Apple symbol. So does Apple not want companies to know their suppliers, or for the public to know just how cheap their iPhone really is? 

Iphone to trickle by end of June or early July. April 19, 2007

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Whispers on the street have it that Apple has run into some issues with the iPhone‘s OS, preventing a solid supply of the much-ballyhooed phone to hit stores in time for the launch. A source from the manufacturer has this to say on the situation: “It does not look feasible that Apple will be able to ship units out in May to make the shipping date in the US (June), so expect units to trickle by end of June or early July.” Apparently, Apple has sent 50 engineers to Taipei to work around the clock to get the bugs worked out so the iPhone can ship on time. That’s a lot of engineers. The source claims that such a shift in manpower is part of the reason Leopard was delayed. We’re not sure how likely it is that Apple would send that many people halfway around the world, but anything is possible. Take it with a grain of salt.

Iphone Photos January 10, 2007

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 apple-iphone-38.jpg

iPhone combines three products — a revolutionary mobile phone, a widescreen iPod with touch controls, and a breakthrough Internet communications device with desktop-class email, web browsing, maps, and searching — into one small and lightweight handheld device. iPhone also introduces an entirely new user interface based on a large multi-touch display and pioneering new software, letting you control everything with just your fingers. So it ushers in an era of software power and sophistication never before seen in a mobile device, completely redefining what you can do on a mobile phone.

How to Get the Cheapest Flight Every Single Time January 4, 2007

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For more details please check out this site

http://blog.auinteractive.com/how-to-get-the-cheapest-flight-every-single-time